Whoa, I Didn’t Know That! – Week 1 Edition

  • Brett
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Call me a sports nerd but I am someone that finds random trivia facts about football entertaining. Nothing beats watching college football on ESPN and having them flash up the Aflac trivia question of the game. If you like sports trivia, than I have just the thing for you. As we head into the first week of the 2013 NFL season, I will bring you ten random facts about the NFL. Maybe next time you are playing trivia, they will ask one of these questions and you will know the answer thanks to me! If nothing else, enjoy these random NFL trivia facts:

 

(Credit: Blog.TheScore.Com)

(Credit: Blog.TheScore.Com)

10. Most cheerleaders are paid less than $100 a game: In fact, TBD.com’s Amanda Hess calculated that after all of the money spent by cheerleaders on things such as makeup, hair, dance classes and gym memberships, they actually lose money by signing up to be an NFL cheerleader. (Source)

(Credit: Bleacher Report)

(Credit: Bleacher Report)

9. During an average NFL game, a viewer is likely to watch six more minutes of replays than the actual game: During an average NFL game, a fan is likely to see 67 minutes of the players standing around (pre-snap), 17 minutes of replays, 11 minutes of game play and 3 seconds of cheerleaders. (Source)

(Credit: ljworld.com)

(Credit: ljworld.com)

8. Two players have caught, rushed and threw a touchdown against the same team, in the same game: In 1979, Walter Payton ran for a touchdown, threw for a touchdown and caught a touchdown against the Minnesota Vikings. The only other player to achieve the same feat was New England Patriots’ David Patten in 2001 against the Indianapolis Colts. (Source)

(Credit: Newsone.com)

(Credit: Newsone.com)

7. Tony Dorsett is the only player to rush for a 99-yard touchdown: During a Monday Night Football Game against the Minnesota Vikings on January 3, 1983, Dallas Cowboys running back Tony Dorsett set the record for the longest rush from the line of scrimmage after breaking off a 99-yard run. The record has never been match since. (Video) (Source)

(Credit: Mentalfloss.com)

(Credit: Mentalfloss.com)

6. LeRoy Butler started the Lambeau Leap tradition in Green Bay on December 26, 1993: The Lambeau Leap is one of the most recognized touchdown celebrations in the NFL. But how did it all get started? The first leap occurred on December 26, 1993. As the Packers faced off against the Los Angeles Raiders, defensive lineman Reggie White recovered a fumble and then threw a lateral to safety LeRoy Butler. When Butler returned the lateral for a touchdown, he leaped into the stands to celebrate. The celebration has stood the test of time and is still used to celebrate touchdowns at Lambeau Field today. (Video) (Source)

(Credit: Buymerican.com)

(Credit: Buymerican.com)

5. It takes roughly 3,000 cows to make a season’s supply of footballs for the NFL: Not only does it take nearly 3,000 cows to make a season’s worth of footballs, but one small town in Ohio makes every NFL football. Since 1955, the town of Ada, Ohio has been the home of the Wilson football factory. The workers of the factory make every football that is used during the NFL season.  (Source) (Source)

(Credit: Zimbio.com)

(Credit: Zimbio.com)

4. In 1997, Minnesota Vikings quarterback Brad Johnson threw a touchdown pass to himself: On October 12, 1997 during a game against the Carolina Panthers, Minnesota Vikings quarterback Brad Johnson managed to throw a touchdown to himself. With the Vikings on the 3-yard line, Brad Johnson attempted to throw a pass but it was batted down at the line. Johnson managed to catch the ball and then run cover the three yards to score a touchdown. (Video) (Source)

(Credit: Sports-Illustrated)

(Credit: Sports-Illustrated)

3. The yellow first-down line shown during football broadcasts costs networks roughly $5 million: It costs networks $20,000 per game to use the technology to broadcast a yellow line where the first down marker is located on the field. When you do the math of $20,000 per game times 16 games times 32 teams divided by 2 teams per game you get a season total of $5,120,000. When you consider the league minimum in 2013 is $405,000, the cost of the yellow line is worth the same as five players making the NFL minimum. (Source)

(Credit: Wikipedia.org)

(Credit: Wikipedia.org)

2. In 1943, With America involved in World War II, the Pittsburgh Steelers & the Philadelphia Eagles joined to form the ‘Steagles': With a number of players on both teams enlisted in the armed forces, in 1943, the Philadelphia Eagles and Pittsburgh Steelers were forced to combine teams and were effectively called the ‘Steagles’. The two teams combined for a 5-4-1 record. During the following year, the Pittsburgh Steelers joined with the Chicago Cardinals. The combined squads ended the season 0-10 and were known as the ‘Carpits’. (Source) (S0urce)

(Credit: Sportsgrid.com)

(Credit: Sportsgrid.com)

1. There have been 13 passing touchdowns from the line of scrimmage of 99-yards. The last? Eli Manning to Victor Cruz on December 24, 2011: The complete list of 99-yard passing touchdowns include  Victor Cruz from Eli Manning, New York Giants vs. New York Jets, Dec. 24, 2011. Wes Welker from Tom Brady, New England Patriots vs. Miami Dolphins, Sept. 12, 2011. Bernard Berrian from Gus Frerotte, Minnesota Vikings vs. Chicago Bears, Nov. 30, 2008. Andre’ Davis from Jeff Garcia, Cleveland Browns vs. Cincinnati Bengals, Oct. 17, 2004. Marc Boerigter from Trent Green, Kansas City Chiefs vs. San Diego Chargers, Dec. 22, 2002. Robert Brooks from Brett Favre, Green Bay Packers vs. Chicago Bears, Sept. 11, 1995. Tony Martin from Stan Humphries, San Diego Chargers vs. Seattle Seahawks, Sept. 18, 1994. Mike Quick from Ron Jaworski, Philadelphia Eagles vs. Atlanta Falcons, Nov. 10, 1985. Cliff Branch from Jim Plunkett, Los Angeles Raiders vs. Washington Redskins, Oct. 2, 1983. Gerry Allen from Sonny Jurgensen, Washington Redskins vs. Chicago Bears, Sept. 15, 1968. Pat Studstill from Karl Sweetan, Detroit Lions vs. Baltimore Colts, Oct. 16, 1966. Bobby Mitchell from George Izo, Washington Redskins vs. Cleveland Browns, Sept. 15, 1963. Andy Farkas from Frank Filchock, Washington Redskins vs. Pittsburgh Steelers, Oct. 15, 1939. (Source)

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