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How to Improve Your Golf Swing

  • Jason Whitney

One of the most universally loved aspects of golf is you get a handicap that allows you to compete fairly against other golfers, whether they’re professionals or 28 handicappers. Of course, once you’ve got your handicap, the first thing you want to do is improve your golf swing – and ultimately win – whether it’s your friendly Sunday morning four-ball at your local club or a prestigious board competition.

The big decision is how do you go about improving your golf swing? Do you have lessons with your club professional? Do you spend hours on the driving-range or practice ground honing the swing that nature gave you? Or do you opt for using one of the various golf training aids that are available to buy?

If you want to improve your golf swing – and you’re not sure how to go about it – here are the pros and cons of all three options:

Lessons with a professional

The standard of teaching amongst golf club professionals varies wildly in regard to both cost and the standard of teaching. I saw an interview with English professional golfer Ross Fisher recently in which he confessed he’d paid golf guru Dave Stockton £2,000 for a lesson – WOW!

Of course the average club professional only charges between £15 and £25 for a half-hour lesson, but the cost can still mount-up if you have a few. The biggest problem with most golf professionals is that they have a standard way of teaching, a manual that is designed to make everyone swing the same way – the perfect golf swing. However, due to the complexities of the human body, this isn’t possible. There’s no way a woman who’s 5 feet 7 inches tall is going to swing it exactly the same way as a man who’s 6 feet 3 inches tall. Equally, even people who are the same height and sex have different length bodies or legs or arms – meaning their swings are likely to have their own individual traits. I mean just look at the professionals – they don’t swing it all the same way!

Practising Hard

If you like the swing you’ve got, you might prefer to try and improve your golf swing by practising hard on the driving range or practice facilities at your golf club. Practise makes perfect – or so they say. The problem with practising on your own is that there’s nobody there to tell you why you might be slicing it or hooking it, or just annoyingly hitting it just a few yards off-line. If you reach this point, this is often when golfers turn to using golf swing training aids or a golf swing analyser in a bid to make the required improvement.

If you like the swing you’ve got, you might prefer to try and improve your golf swing by practising hard on the driving range or practice facilities at your golf club. Practise makes perfect – or so they say. The problem with practising on your own is that there’s nobody there to tell you why you might be slicing it or hooking it, or just annoyingly hitting it just a few yards off-line. If you reach this point, this is often when golfers turn to using golf swing training aids or a golf swing analyser in a bid to make the required improvement.

Golf swing aids or golf swings trainers, as some people like to call them, perform a variety of roles in trying to improve the average golf swing. Some are designed to improve alignment but offer little in the way of feedback. Some concentrate on tempo but don’t really offer insight into your swing faults. Others, fashionably named golf swing analysers, uses sensors and mobile devices to capture golf swing date and analyse it – though these tend to be at the expensive end of the market.

One value-for-money golfing training aid that does offer you insight into what’s wrong with your golf swing is the Swing Boss. It’s simple yet effective design combines Velcro pads and ultra-lightweight balls which stick to the club-face when hit; offering insight into why you might be hitting the ball off-line. The Swing Boss also comes with a tuition package that explains how you can correct a wide variety of faults by analysing where the ball has impacted the club-face. The big advantage of this is that you can quickly recognise your faults, learn how to correct them, and then take this knowledge out onto the golf course with you – quickly self-diagnosing and fixing any faults that occur in your swing during your round. It’s also ideal for using in the garden or anywhere else you have room to swing a golf club.

 

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Jason Whitney

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