Jamie Moyer, 50, attempting comeback as a knuckleballer

  • David Whitlock

Jamie Moyer, who was made history when he was on the Colorado Rockies opening day roster in 2012 at the age of 49,  isn’t so sure he might not play again.  According to Stan Hochman of the Philadelphia Daily News (philly.com), Moyer is still working out with an aim to return to the majors as a knuckleballer.  The co-author of his recent book, “Just Tell Me I Can’t,” has been around Moyer a lot the past year and noted his desire to return:

Well, he’s not retired. He did play around with a knuckleball this summer. Talked to Charlie Hough, to Tim Wakefield. He just loves the challenge of learning something new.

Moyer sits at 269 career wins, the last of which was May 16, 2012, making him the oldest winning pitcher in major league player history.  He took the mound for two more starts before being released.  Moyer was known to defy the odds the last several years of his career, recording more victories in his 40’s than he did in his 20’s.  His fastball topped out somewhere around 80 MPH for most of that stretch and his breaking balls weren’t items of legend.  He’s played 25 seasons, exactly a quarter century, and is the all time “leader” in home runs allowed by a pitcher with 522.  He made his first and only All-Star appearance in 2003, at the age of 40.

Credit: Soraspy.com

Is there any life left in his left arm?
Credit: SoRaspy.com

Could it just be a ploy to sell more books?  Because there’s no way he could pull it off.  I wouldn’t tell him he can’t.

- David Whitlock

Or follow us on Twitter
– David Whitlock
– Blog
– Sports-Kings

Share & Rate

From The Web

From SK Network

discussion by

About The Author

David Whitlock

David Whitlock - manager

David (a.k.a. Longhorndave or lhd_on_sports) joined the staff late in the 2012 season and moved to Site Manager in early 2013. A lifelong Houston Astros fan (and mini-season ticket holder for 9 years) he attends 20+ games per year. A statistics freak, David still keeps score the "old fashioned way" on occasion (and has kept manual score of World Series games since 1986 and retains the sheets). He was a featured guest weekly on the Phil Naessens Show. He is also a Texas Longhorns alumnus and huge football and baseball fan of his alma mater. When he isn't watching or writing about baseball, he works as a contractor at NASA Johnson Space Center. He lives by the mantra "a bad day at the ballpark is better than a good day anywhere else."

Leave a Comment

Fill Out All Required Fields


5 − = 2

From SK Network